The Bathing Machine

The Victorian
Bathing Machine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

     The bathing machine was a device, popular in the 18th and 19th centuries, to allow people to change out of their usual clothes, possibly change into swimwear and then wade in the ocean at beaches. Bathing machines were roofed and walled wooden carts rolled into the sea. Some had solid wooden walls; others had canvas walls over a wooden frame.

     The bathing machine was part of etiquette for sea-bathing more rigorously enforced upon women than men but to be observed by both sexes among those who wished to be "proper".

     Especially in Britain, men and women were usually segregated, so nobody of the opposite sex might catch sight of them in their bathing suits, which (although modest by modern standards) were not considered proper clothing in which to be seen

Sawyer's Bathing Machine Ad
Sawyer's Bathing Machine Ad

Bathing Machines at Margate
Bathing Machines at Margate
Using a Bathing Machine
Using a Bathing Machine
Bathing Machines Line Beach
Bathing Machines Line Beach
Family Bathing Party - Street Clothes
Family Bathing Party - Street Clothes
Colorized Lady’s Bathing Party
Colorized Lady’s Bathing Party
Bathing Machines “Improve the View”
Bathing Machines “Improve the View”

     The Snark did indeed have inexplicable taste, believing that the presence of bathing machines improved the ocean view. It is not clear how he carried one around with him. He had no horse. Did the bandersnach pull it? We shall never know for sure.

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